Category: News

About William RodriguezAbout William Rodriguez

You have probably heard of William Rodriguez in connection with the deadly Twin Tower blasts that shook America in September, 2001. He was a janitor working at the basement of the World Trade Center’s North Tower when the attacks happened and the American Airlines flight crashed into the WTC building. He had risked his life to save the lives of many others and was awarded the National Hero Award for his exemplary courage by the Puerto Rican Senate.

It was reported that Rodriguez had been instrumental in guiding teams of firefighters through the staircases, unlocking doors on the way, and rescuing and helping hundreds of survivors. He had re-entered the building to save his friends trapped at the top and in doing so, managed to save many others as well. He rose to much prominence in the Hispanic community because he had extended his help to start an economic amnesty program to help the 9/11 undocumented workers. In 2004, he even sued the then President George W. Bush amongst others for their complicity in these attacks. Following this, he has travelled extensively discussing his conspiracy theories and experience relating to 9/11.

Glasgow’s Herald Newspaper has called him the “poster boy” for a new movement, the 9/11 truth campaign. He held the master key that fateful day and this helped him save so many lives. He has claimed that he had helped 15 people to safety from the tower and newspapers claim that he had successfully raised almost $122 million for victims. In 2004 he claimed in the lawsuit against Bush that the bombs had been planted in the basement and that the towers had been demolished in a controlled way. However, Rodriguez had not witnessed any such devices himself. It is claimed that of the 27 witnesses he had offered to the Commission, it had allegedly refused to interview them. Moreover, none of the 15 whom he had rescued single-handedly was identified. 

Rodriguez had claimed that he had used the master key he had to rescue people who were locked inside and managed to evacuate many like this. He even stated that he had refused many Hollywood productions that had offered him big money to write books and make movies about him. He even stated that he had actually seen one of the hijackers a couple of months before the attacks. Whatever evidence he had offered to the Commission was never made public and not itemized in its report. Only 160 out of the 1200 and more witness accounts were conducted in public. This is why Rodriguez complained that his testimony did not feature in the report and many of the people he had saved were never asked to testify. In its defence, the Commission had stated that this report only summarizes the entire findings and cites only a few of the many sources it had consulted. It further clarified that because of the scope of events that touched so many types of organizations and issues, it was not feasible to interview every individual or identify every useful document. The report was only meant to offer an insight into an event that changed the history of the US overnight. Post 9/11, Rodriguez continued to work for the Hispanic community, organizing a Hispanic Victims Group that works with 150 families today.